Reservoir Park Streambank Restoration Project

Reservoir Park Streambank Restoration Project

In the Fall of 2017 a letter was received from Governor Tom Wolf notifying the Borough that it was awarded $300,000 from the Community Conservation Partnerships Program to restore Reservoir Park. The budget for this project is approximately $400,000. In summer of 2019 the Borough began the design and engineering work for this project and construction is expected to begin in the Spring of 2020. The Borough has begun work on the submission of a second grant application for approximately $100,000.  This grant will seek finds from Delco Green Ways (Delaware County, PA) to support the remaining $100,000 of the project. The park restoration project will restore the land and water features of the park the conditions of which have eroded due to the increasing energy and volumes of stormwater. The park is a passive natural area of daylight for the Falls Run a tributary to Darby Creek. The stream is listed as impaired for aquatic life use on the Integrated List of Waters. Sources of impairment include variable water flows, siltation runoff, storm sewers and, over time, habitat modification. Increased regional development has stressed on Falls Creek’s ability to convey an abundant amount of stormwater during rain events. This increase of concentrated stormwater discharge has resulted in severe streambank erosion, undercutting, channel incision, overbanking, and sand and gravel bars within Reservoir Park. The erosive condition has reached a point where stream bank and floodplain restoration need to be contained and redirected. Restoration of Falls Run will enhance its ability to handle peak flows from rain events, improve the integrity of the stream bank, replenish and improve the riparian vegetation and ecology, address stream morphology, and improve the aquatic habitat. Restoration will consist of urban and natural channel design techniques, that could include cross vanes, single arm vanes, root-wads, and brush mattresses; hard armoring; and construction of marsh areas. Live native plantings will provide for stream bank soil stabilization, as well as, buffer restoration and hard armoring stabilization. In the Fall of 2017 a letter was received from Governor Tom Wolf notifying the Borough that it was awarded $300,000 from the Community Conservation Partnerships Program to restore Reservoir Park. The budget for this project is approximately $400,000. In summer of 2019 the Borough began the design and engineering work for this project and construction is expected to begin in the Spring of 2020. The Borough has begun work on the submission of a second grant application for approximately $100,000.

This grant will seek finds from Delco Green Ways (Delaware County, PA) to support the remaining $100,000 of the project. The park restoration project will restore the land and water features of the park the conditions of which have eroded due to the increasing energy and volumes of stormwater. The park is a passive natural area of daylight for the Falls Run a tributary to Darby Creek. The stream is listed as impaired for aquatic life use on the Integrated List of Waters. Sources of impairment include variable water flows, siltation runoff, storm sewers and, over time, habitat modification. Increased regional development has stressed on Falls Creek’s ability to convey an abundant amount of stormwater during rain events. This increase of concentrated stormwater discharge has resulted in severe streambank erosion, undercutting, channel incision, overbanking, and sand and gravel bars within Reservoir Park. The erosive condition has reached a point where stream bank and floodplain restoration need to be contained and redirected.

Restoration of Falls Run will enhance its ability to handle peak flows from rain events, improve the integrity of the stream bank, replenish and improve the riparian vegetation and ecology, address stream morphology, and improve the aquatic habitat. Restoration will consist of urban and natural channel design techniques, that could include cross vanes, single arm vanes, root-wads, and brush mattresses; hard armoring; and construction of marsh areas. Live native plantings will provide for stream bank soil stabilization, as well as, buffer restoration and hard armoring stabilization.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.